Marc Faber Agrees, ‘Get the Hell Out’

By Dominique de Kevelioc de Bailleul

The message to investors should be most clear by now: Quickly get your cash out of financial institutions and buy some gold.

“It’s very dangerous to put everything in cash with MF Global or another financial institution, because I’m not too sure about the law . . . if the law will protect you as a depositor or an account holder,” editor of the Gloom Boom Doom Report Marc Faber tells Bloomberg.

Whether the messenger comes way of an up-straight and straight-up N.Y. City Italian, an exiled American living in Central America, a young woman totting firearms and a Bible, or an eccentric Swiss-born money manager living in Chiang Mai, Thailand, each warn investors and savers that cash on account is not safe at financial institutions—no matter how much the FDIC or SIPC insures.

Gerald Celente, Jim Willie, Ann Barnhardt and, now, Marc Faber warn the runs on Greek, Spanish, Italian and several Eastern European banks will eventually come to the U.S.  And if investors and savers think they’re covered in the event of a failure, a media-downplayed ruling by United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit of Aug. 9, regarding the bankruptcy case of Sentinel Management Group, too many will come to know that their cash is most definitely exposed to what many say is legal theft.

“The system is rigged. . . if you don’t have it [assets] in your possession, you don’t own it,” said Celente, following word that his commodities brokerage account was seized in Jon Corzine’s MF Global bankruptcy of Oct. 31, 2011.

“JPM has seen fit to gobble private accounts at both MF Global and PFG-Best, with regulatory blessing as the courts sprinkled fascist holy water,” writes Jim Willie of the Golden Jackass newsletter.

“If you don’t understand what ‘get the hell out’ means, there’s not much I can do for you,” Ann Barnhardt commented, after hearing of the Seventh Circuit of Appeals ruling.

In the case of Sentinel, its creditor, BNY Mellon, contended that its secured loan with the Chicago futures brokerage firm takes priority over other loans which may have been secured by Sentinel’s pledge of allocated accounts.

“The appeals court affirmed an earlier district court ruling that the bank had a ‘secured position’ on a $312 million loan it gave to Sentinel, which turned out to have been secured by customer money,” according to Reuters of Aug. 9.

“I don’t think that’s what the Commodity Futures Trading Commission had in mind” with its requirement that brokers keep customer money separate from their own,” Reuters quoted Sentinel trustee Fred Grede.

“It does not bode well for the protection of customer funds,” he added, “I’m sure Mr. Corzine’s attorneys will get a hold of this ruling and use it for all it’s worth.”

Other than strongly recommending that idle cash be removed from U.S. banks and broker-dealers, Faber says investors and savers, alike, should hold some gold to protect their savings from another insidious means of ‘institutional’ theft in store from them in the future: the loss of purchasing power of their Federal Reserve notes.

“I think they [Fed] will print money and that eventually everything will become more expensive. . . and I would hold some gold . . . and I would hold some equities,” he says.

“And I happen to think that one day a lot of corporate bonds will have a higher credit rating than the U.S. government [bonds],” he adds, which coincidentally comes on the same day as another Bloomberg interview with credit rating agency Fitch, who warns the U.S. Treasury of an impending downgrade, if Congress cannot outline plans sometime in the first half of 2013 to narrow a $1.3 trillion annual budget deficit.

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