Marc Faber Agrees, ‘Get the Hell Out’

By Dominique de Kevelioc de Bailleul

The message to investors should be most clear by now: Quickly get your cash out of financial institutions and buy some gold.

“It’s very dangerous to put everything in cash with MF Global or another financial institution, because I’m not too sure about the law . . . if the law will protect you as a depositor or an account holder,” editor of the Gloom Boom Doom Report Marc Faber tells Bloomberg.

Whether the messenger comes way of an up-straight and straight-up N.Y. City Italian, an exiled American living in Central America, a young woman totting firearms and a Bible, or an eccentric Swiss-born money manager living in Chiang Mai, Thailand, each warn investors and savers that cash on account is not safe at financial institutions—no matter how much the FDIC or SIPC insures.

Gerald Celente, Jim Willie, Ann Barnhardt and, now, Marc Faber warn the runs on Greek, Spanish, Italian and several Eastern European banks will eventually come to the U.S.  And if investors and savers think they’re covered in the event of a failure, a media-downplayed ruling by United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit of Aug. 9, regarding the bankruptcy case of Sentinel Management Group, too many will come to know that their cash is most definitely exposed to what many say is legal theft.

“The system is rigged. . . if you don’t have it [assets] in your possession, you don’t own it,” said Celente, following word that his commodities brokerage account was seized in Jon Corzine’s MF Global bankruptcy of Oct. 31, 2011.

“JPM has seen fit to gobble private accounts at both MF Global and PFG-Best, with regulatory blessing as the courts sprinkled fascist holy water,” writes Jim Willie of the Golden Jackass newsletter.

“If you don’t understand what ‘get the hell out’ means, there’s not much I can do for you,” Ann Barnhardt commented, after hearing of the Seventh Circuit of Appeals ruling.

In the case of Sentinel, its creditor, BNY Mellon, contended that its secured loan with the Chicago futures brokerage firm takes priority over other loans which may have been secured by Sentinel’s pledge of allocated accounts.

“The appeals court affirmed an earlier district court ruling that the bank had a ‘secured position’ on a $312 million loan it gave to Sentinel, which turned out to have been secured by customer money,” according to Reuters of Aug. 9.

“I don’t think that’s what the Commodity Futures Trading Commission had in mind” with its requirement that brokers keep customer money separate from their own,” Reuters quoted Sentinel trustee Fred Grede.

“It does not bode well for the protection of customer funds,” he added, “I’m sure Mr. Corzine’s attorneys will get a hold of this ruling and use it for all it’s worth.”

Other than strongly recommending that idle cash be removed from U.S. banks and broker-dealers, Faber says investors and savers, alike, should hold some gold to protect their savings from another insidious means of ‘institutional’ theft in store from them in the future: the loss of purchasing power of their Federal Reserve notes.

“I think they [Fed] will print money and that eventually everything will become more expensive. . . and I would hold some gold . . . and I would hold some equities,” he says.

“And I happen to think that one day a lot of corporate bonds will have a higher credit rating than the U.S. government [bonds],” he adds, which coincidentally comes on the same day as another Bloomberg interview with credit rating agency Fitch, who warns the U.S. Treasury of an impending downgrade, if Congress cannot outline plans sometime in the first half of 2013 to narrow a $1.3 trillion annual budget deficit.

Now Banks Can Legally Steal Retirement Accounts

By Dominique de Kevelioc de Bailleul

“If you don’t understand what ‘get the hell out’ means, there’s not much I can do for you,” Ann Barnhardt passionately told blogger Warren Pollock, as she warned viewers of systemic failure in the U.S. financial system, as well as the certainty that American savers will be robbed of their retirement, brokerage and savings accounts in the process.

Barnhardt, the former commodities broker, cites the latest and hushed court ruling in the 2007 case of a failed Chicago-based futures brokerage firm Sentinel Management Group—another Ponzi bankruptcy, according to her, totaling $600 million of segregated customer funds tied up in bankruptcy awaiting determination of whether those segregated funds will be used to pay off a “secured position” of a $312 million loan held by Bank of NY Mellon.

According to a federal appeals court ruling, Thursday, Bank of New York Mellon’s secured loan will be put ahead of customer segregated accounts held by Sentinel—a landmark ruling that turns individual segregated accounts into the property of a third party under circumstances of duress.  In other words, if a financial institution fails, clients, depositors and pension funds may not get some or all of their money back in a bankruptcy.

In essence, under the ruling, Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SPIC), Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and other insurance programs no longer will/can protect customer funds, leaving millions of investors, depositors and retirees unaware that they are no longer account holders of their own funds, per se, but, instead, have suddenly become stockholders of the institution with which they have deposited their money.

Copy of the Sentinel Ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals, Seventh Circuit.

Barnhardt goes on to say that many emails she receives from readers of her blog mock her as a Cassandra, but the woman who warned last year of the coming failures and the government’s disregard of the basics of Common Law have been proved correct.  Customers who thought their money was insured with MF Global, PFGBest and, now, Sentinel, were not insured after all, and will lose some or all of their money due to a bankruptcy of the firm in which they’ve placed faith.

She reiterates from numerous previous interviews: run for the hills with your money.  The federal appeals court ruling in the case of Sentinel demonstrates that financial institutions have suddenly taken precedence over segregated customer funds, including their largest customers of all—pension funds.

Few know that the game has changed, and the lack of mainstream media coverage of the shock ruling from the seventh circuit court highly suggests fears within the Fed of a full-blown bank run if the news of Sentinel’s case were to become a front-page headline, underscoring the fragility of the banking system of the United States.

“Insurance is designed to cover discreet, individual catastrophes.  Okay?  If one bank fails, the FDIC can come in and backstop that one bank, no problem,” Barnhardt explains.

“What do you think is going to happen if the entire system collapses?  What happens, do you think, if, even, let’s say 25 percent of the banks or the banking capacity in the United States fails?” she asks, rhetorically.  “We are now talking trillions and trillions of dollars in deposits.”

In fact, the FDIC shows $15.3 billion (Q1 2012) available to insure approximately $4.7 trillion of deposits (last reported, Q4 2008), or an insurance pool equivalent to one-third of one cent (0.0033) held at the FDIC for each dollar insured within the banking system.

Presently, the FDIC cannot make whole on even one percent of bank deposits covered under its insurance program, though it claims to cover up to $250,000 for each account, a promise that surely will be broken (at least when compared with today’s purchasing power of one dollar) during a systemic banking system failure, according to Barnhardt.

“The analogy is to the fire department,” she adds.  “The fire department work great if one house is on fire.  What happens if the entire city, if every structure in the city is on fire?”

Barnhardt concludes her interview with two thoughts:

Firstly, in a democratic republic, collectively, Americans are ultimately responsible for the financial system by voting for “psychopaths” to guard against allowing other psychopaths to run the banking system.  The coming financial collapse would not be possible with an informed and vigilant electorate, according to her.

Secondly, Barnhardt, a devout Christian, prays for people to wake up in time to protect themselves before the collapse takes place, which she says could be tomorrow, or as far out as two years from now.

Source: Barnhardt.biz

MF Global Case Exposes JP Morgan COMEX Fraud

With 19 days left in the year 2011, one would think that the famous Ann Barnhardt interview, posted Dec. 1, on the FinancialSense Newshour website was a shoo-in for the most important interview about your money this year.  Sign-up for my 100% FREE Alerts

But, it appears that Jim Willie of The Hat Trick Letter takes Barnhardt’s gruesome assessment of the financial industry several steps forward in classic Jim Willie style.  Marc Faber, Jim Rogers and, even Gerald Celente, Peter Schiff and Max Keiser, don’t do quite the justice to the topic of: the tag team effort by the bankers, regulators and politicians who conspire to fleece the American people, like Jim Willie can do.

For those already familiar with Jim Willie, go right to a most fascinating interview with the man, who, prior to the Lehman collapse, was unfairly referred to as ‘Crazy Jim’ for his ‘ridiculous’ prediction for systemic financial collapse at a time when the compelling evidence for such an event could only be appreciated by those few among us steeped in all the academic disciplines of money, history and of human behavior, rolled up into one.

Jim Willie interview, click here.

For those unfamiliar ears to the Willie experience, his presentations sound no less crazy than they’ve sounded of the past.  His presentation of the facts, the events of past and present, as well as the conclusions he draws, appear ‘nutty’ to the layperson.

But no one can ever say that the man has ever been wrong about what he has for many years envisioned—and expressed in no uncertain terms, proving once again the adage: It’s not, what a man says; it’s the posture in which the man says it, that appeals to the man-on-the street.  See Milgrim Experiment.

Though Willie earned a Ph.D. in inferential statistics, he won’t wear a suit and tie or a lab coat.  You’ll have to take in the data and draw your own conclusions, because he sounds exasperated from those around him who won’t listen—even his own family members.

Jim Willie, PhD., now, presumably, lives a peaceful life in Costa Rica, where he publishes his famous Hat Trick Letter.