Dennis Gartman is a Fraud—in Yen Terms

In his typical pompous, weak-chinned facade, alleged gold expert Dennis Gartman has declared that the decade-long bull market in gold is dead—again—and again.  He penned in his newsletter, Gartman Letter:

“ . . . in retrospect it does appear that gold has not been in a bull market but has indeed been in a bear market” since peaking at $1,920 in August 2011. Sign-up for my 100% FREE Alerts

“Since then,” he continued “each new interim low has been lower and each new interim high has followed. How, we ask, had we missed that fact!”

Apparently, Gartman misses a lot of facts, but he doesn’t miss an appearance on CNBC to drum up more suckers to his newsletter.  He figures since investors don’t bother with due diligence on stock recommendations, they won’t research Gartman’s most-abysmal track record either.  See chart, below.

In keeping with the CNBC’s Steve Liesman cadre of phony economic theorists and Fed sycophants, Gartman reminds his fellow bourgeoisie that he should never be mistaken for a dreaded gold bug proletariat, nor should anyone even think for a moment that he could actually be a closet ‘prepper.’

“I don’t like being long of gold. I don’t like the gold bugs,” he said, affirming his allegiance to CNBC producers.  “I’m not a believer that the world is coming to an end.”

“Nonetheless the trend in gold in all sorts of currencies, whether in dollar terms, euro terms, yen terms, has been…from the lower left to the upper right,” he stated, contradicting his previous assessment that gold’s chart pattern indicates a bear market in the precious metal.

Gartman, a gold bug?  No.  Mr. Gartman is a sophisticated man, with all of his teeth and education to prove he is no rube who owns at least a shotgun.  Moreover, he sports a beard to match Bernanke’s and Krugman’s—the Smith Brothers trio of the Church of Keynes.

“They genuflect in gold’s direction; we merely acknowledge that it exists as a trading vehicle and nothing more. There are times to be bullish, and times to be bearish … to every season, as Ecclesiastes tells us,” stated Gartman.

However, Gartman neglected to quote Deuteronomy, Genesis and Revelations, all of which tell us that he is as full of bull as Bernanke and Krugman are.

Deuteronomy 23:19  Thou shalt not lend upon usury to thy brother; usury of money, usury of victuals, usury of any thing that is lent upon usury.

Genesis 2:12 And the gold of that land is good: there is bdellium and the onyx stone.

Rev 3:18 I counsel thee to buy of me gold tried in the fire, that thou mayest be rich; and white raiment, that thou mayest be clothed, and that the shame of thy nakedness do not appear; and anoint thine eyes with eyesalve, that thou mayest see.


Ultimately, when the dollar collapses and gold can’t be pried loose from the public at $5,000 per ounce (400,000, in yen terms), Gartman can be expected to start quoting Romans 13 in his newsletter. Sign-up for my 100% FREE Alerts

Gold Price: Lord Haw-Haw Dennis Gartman announces “Death of a Bull”

Timing gold purchases is quite often very difficult, even for the so-called pros.  So if you think you don’t have what it takes to trade among the best, don’t feel bad, even the ‘pros’ get it wrong.  Sign-up for my 100% FREE Alerts

Taking Virginia-based economist and publisher of the Gartman Letter, Dennis Gartman, for example.  His track record for forecasting gold prices is so bad that he’s become known as the latest contrary indicator—a ‘professional’ punter, if you will.

Moreover, it’s been suggested that the reason for Gartman’s subscription base is to get fast-track knowledge of Gartman’s trade so that a trader can take the other side.

Just last week, Gartman told Bloomberg News, “we are out of gold” as of Monday (Dec. 12) and “the beginnings of a real bear market, and the death of a bull.”

Sounds dreadful, doesn’t it?  So what should gold holders do?  Well, let’s see how the advice of the gold market’s Lord Haw-Haw panned out for investors during previous corrective phases—which, by the way, are those very times when buying gold makes more sense in a secular bull market.

“I feared the whole financial system was coming to a halt, and you need a little gold in that case,” Gartman told Bloomberg News on Nov. 3, 2008.  “I doubt it will anymore. But it sure felt like it a month ago. There’s no value in gold now.”  (See chart, below.)

Three weeks later, on Nov. 25, Gartman didn’t change his mind; he got more bearish when he should have been a raving bull!

“We are short of gold,” he said in a Bloomberg interview. “We shall always sell rallies such as these that retrace as classically as this market has.”

As the market continued to rally, Gartman became ever more aloof, stating on November 16, 2009 that there was, indeed, “a gold bubble” and anyone thinking otherwise is “naive.”

Apparently, ‘Mr. Gold’ James Sinclair of JSMineset hasn’t been a long-term subscriber to the Gartman Letter.  Eight weeks earlier, Sinclair saw gold for what it is: a hedge against currency devaluations.

“The carry trade has dropped the dollar as a currency of choice,” Sinclair told Bloomberg Radio in a Oct. 7, 2009.  “Gold is competition to currencies,” and added that he expects gold to reach $1,650 per ounce by the first quarter of 2011.  Sinclair was off by five months, as gold soared during the summer of 2011, reaching his $1,650 price target in August.

Back to Gartman:

Somewhere between the dates Nov. 16, 2009 and May 18, 2010, Gartman became to think, maybe, it was he who was naïve about the gold market, jumped back into the “bubble” at some point during the six-month period, then proclaimed to Reuters on May, 18, 2010, “We want out and are heading for the sidelines.”

Now Gartman tells us gold is done.  Finished.  The Fed is done bailing out banks on both sides of the Atlantic and a deflationary collapse is coming.

Apparently, others, too, have noticed Gartman’s poor record of calling bull market tops.  Didn’t Marc Faber make reference to these misguided souls in his interview with Financial Sense Newshour?  See BER article, Marc Faber Fears Gold Confiscation.

From zerohedge.com:

“In August 2011, Gartman said that gold was the biggest bubble of our lifetime. Inconsistently, only last week, Gartman said on CNBC that he is ‘long gold’ and has been for ‘six or seven months’,” zerohedge’s ‘Tyler Durden’ wrote.

“Gartman’s short term calls on gold and silver have been wrong more often than not in recent years. He tends to turn bearish after gold has already experienced a correction and is close to bottoming.

“Those wishing to diversify and add gold to their portfolio will use his call as a contrarian signal that we may be getting close to a low in this most recent sell off. Our advice is to ignore gurus, price predictions and noise – up and down – and focus on the real fundamentals driving the gold market.”

The obvious question, therefore, is: Why subscribe to the Gartman Letter while others steeped in the gold market have gotten it right?  One doesn’t have to pay for some good advice.  Just point your browser to King World News and listen to Eric King’s interviews with the gold market’s real McCoys, or read James Sinclair’s JSMineset.com blog.  Sign-up for my 100% FREE Alerts

Gold Price poised to “Go Parabolic” to $2,100

As the gold price touched $1,890 per the ounce in London trading today, persistent doubt of the consensus forecast for U.S. and Europe economic growth has weighed down equities, lifted bond prices, and soared gold, as traders scramble in and out of positions to suit renewed uncertainty and the growing distrust of the Fed as well as European and U.S. policymakers.

Adding to the stack of the most recent gold-bullish news, which has been streaming in nearly daily now, comes Hugo Chavez’s request for a repatriation of Venezuela’s gold reserves from the Bank of England.

CEO of Hinde Capital, Ben Davies, today told King World News he believes Chavez’s move to bring 365 tons of gold reserves back to Venezuela could result in an explosive move in the gold price, as data suggest that the gold market has operated equivalently to a banking fractional reserve system since 1971—and a highly levered fractional system, at that.

“There was a game changer event yesterday: Chavez – the proverbial thorn in the West’s side – ruined the gold-bears’ picnic, “ stated Davies.  “So what? I hear you say. Well I believe this is significant. Chavez holds 365.7 tonnes of gold overseas, mostly in Western Central Bank vaults, such as the Bank of England. Some 100 tonnes of Venezuelan gold is held there.”

“The question is: do these vaults still have all the gold?” Davies asked rhetorically, who now targets gold at $2,100 on this move.

In fact, the gold may not be there, according to Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee, who has published numerous articles showing the steep ratio between “paper” gold and the physical.  Davies said that the global gold market’s fractional reserve system “means each troy ounce has been lent or swapped out many times over, and should gold holders request the return of their gold en masse, we could get a proverbial ‘gold bank’ run.”

If Chavez’s move triggers a gold run, or not, it most certainly will spark at least some fear into those traders seeking an empty chair before the music stops in the gold market.  Force majeures at a time of panic to gold will leave wealth exposed to the threat of cliff-dive devaluations and bizarrely-priced physical gold ounce bars, a possible scenario that could turn rich people into poor ones, and vice versa.

Chavez appears nervous about the situation in the gold market, and may trigger other countries to repatriate their gold from Western entities, too, in another bullion bank run similar to the run on Ft. Knox in the early 1970s.

Even the U.S. dollar apologist of the gold market Dennis Gartman of the Gartman Letter is getting skittish about the possibility of a flashpoint in the currency markets.

“Gold is strong in any and all currency terms, and it is now entering that stage when prices go parabolic,” Gartman stated in his Gartman Letter.

Flight out of the U.S. dollar and euro won’t have many paths to left to safety, as banking officials of well-managed currencies fight back the stem of appreciation.  A recent survey among Swiss reveals a majority of respondents alarmed by the rise in the franc, and fear a string franc will devastate exports of Swiss-made goods.

“You have a look at some of the other safe-haven assets that investors were looking at, the Swiss franc and Japanese yen,” Fat Prophets resource analyst David Lennox told Bloomberg.  “Authorities there have taken steps to try and curb the rise in those particular currencies. That’s probably pushed more investors into gold.”